Walter H. Squires & Son
3rd Generation Family Funeral Directors, Established 1933


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From Tradition & Integrity Comes Peace of Mind

THE CORONER
The Coroner is the person responsible for investigating deaths and is usually a doctor, solicitor, police officer or lawyer. If the Coroner is involved an investigation will be carried out to determine the exact cause of death. You will be unable to register death until the Coroner’s findings are concluded. The Coroner is usually required to investigate a death if: -

  • The deceased has not seen the doctor in the last 14 days.

  • The death was violent, unnatural or is uncertain.

  • The cause of death is not known or is uncertain.

  • The death occurred whilst the person was undergoing an operation or under the effects of anaesthetic.

  • The death was caused by an industrial disease.

  • The death occurred in prison or in police custody.

A death will normally be referred to the Coroner by the doctor who is called when the death occurred. The Coroner can request for an investigation into the cause of death, consisting of a post-mortem examination and possibly an inquest, to be carried out. The Coroner does not require consent from the family for a post mortem examination to take place but the family can ask for a doctor to be present.

Once the Coroner has been informed:-

  • NO ACTION NECESSARY – Having heard of all the circumstances, the Coroner may decide that no post-mortem is necessary. In this case the Coroner will issue a Form 100a (this is usually sent direct to the Registrar) to allow the registration to take place. The Medical Certificate of Cause of Death (this will be issued by the Doctor) will also be needed to complete registration. The Registrar will issue the Certificate for Burial or Cremation (Green Certificate) which must be delivered to us as soon as possible. If cremation has been chosen we will arrange for the Cremation Forms 4 and 5 to be completed, as is required by cremation law.
     

  • A POST-MORTEM IS NECESSARY – If the results of a post-mortem conclude that the death was due to natural causes the Coroner will issue a Form 100b (this is usually sent direct to the Registrar) to allow the registration to take place. In the case of burial the Registrar will issue the Certificate for Burial or Cremation (Green Certificate) which must be delivered to us as soon as possible. If cremation has been chosen the Coroner will issue a Coroner’s Certificate for Cremation – Form 6 (this will be sent direct to the crematorium by us or the Coroner) which replaces the Certificate for Burial or Cremation (Green Certificate) and the Cremation Forms 4 and 5.
     

  • INQUEST FOLLOWING POST-MORTEM – If the Coroner is not satisfied that death was due to natural causes or that it was caused, or was contributed to, by one of the many conditions in which an inquest is necessary (some of which are detailed in the Inquest section of this leaflet) an inquest will be held. If the cause of death is established and given in evidence at the opening of the inquest the following forms will normally be issued:-

    • Coroner’s Order for Burial - Form 101 (this will be collected by us) or

    • Coroner’s Certificate for Cremation – Form 6 (this will be delivered direct to the crematorium by us or the Coroner) and replaces the Certificate for Burial or Cremation (Green Certificate) and the Cremation Forms 4 and 5.

After the inquest has been closed the Coroner will issue a Coroner’s Certificate after Inquest – Form 99 (this is usually sent direct to the Registrar). Once this has been received by the Registrar the family can apply to the Registrar for a Certificate of Registration of Death - Form BD8.

If the cause of death is not established at the inquest the Coroner will only allow burial to take place.

If the cause of death is due to homicide or a Section 1 Road Traffic Accident, and a person or persons is/are to be charged with the offence, only burial will be allowed and then only with the agreement with the Defence of Prosecution.

Inquest
An inquest is an enquiry into the medical cause and circumstances of death. An inquest will be held if a post-mortem examination concludes that the death was:-

  • Violent or unnatural.

  • Caused by an industrial disease.

  • The death occurred in prison.

  • The cause of death remains uncertain after a post mortem examination.

Inquests are held in these circumstances even if death occurred abroad and the body is returned to Britain. An inquest will be held to ascertain:-

  • Who the deceased was.

  • How, when and where the deceased came about their death.

  • The particulars required by the Registration Acts to be registered concerning the death.

If an inquest is held the Coroner will inform the following people:-

  • Married partner of the deceased.

  • Nearest relative (if different from above).

  • Personal representative (if different from above).

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